“Things Fall Apart:” When a Tough Economy, Anxiety, & Medical Stressors Collide

7 Nov

scream blog

For many families, life during these hard economic times can be full of stressful triggers. Putting food on the table, paying the house note, keeping the lights on, getting gas into the car, maintaining your social/love relationships, looking for new work .. all of which can be anxiety provoking. While keeping this scenario in mind, imagine now adding the serious stressor of having a loved one admitted to the hospital or dealing with a new medical illness. It can be enough to literally make you want to pull your hair out! Sadly, this is the reality for many families around the country. If any of this sounds familiar, rest assured that there are resources to help.

1: Sound Mind: Within many hospital settings, there are often well-trained psychologists on staff who are ready and willing to help. They can provide a safe, non-judgmental outlet for you to vent, talk through your fears, address personal challenges, and brainstorm on coping strategies that best fit you. Best of all, these medical psychologists and counseling staff personnel are specially trained to work within the hospital setting to serve those who are affected by the pressures of health concerns. They can offer tools to not only decrease your heightened emotional state, but also ways to promote engaging ill loved ones in a positive way without experiencing what is known as “caregivers fatigue” (when a loved one caring for another becomes physically and emotionally drained).

2: Sound Body: Did you know that many hospitals are now offering spa services? YES! Unbeknownst to many patients and families, a growing number of hospitals around the country are offering holistic services such as: yoga, massage, acupuncture, meditation, dance, and music therapies to name a few. Even beauty enhancement services are becoming increasingly common to address the need of boosting emotional morale. While the primary focus remains treating the illness and ensuring true health, who doesn’t feel better after a nice massage or a few beauty regimes? It reminds families that they are still human and can have a big normalizing effect for everyone who participates.

3: Sound Life: Now that the mind and body have been cared for, what services are available for the other non-medical stressors? With the help of human services, social workers do more than simply help with discharge. They can: work with your doctor and insurance company to ensure care is financially covered as well as make community referrals to assist with securing key needs (such as housing, food, utility support, etc).

In the end, though things may seem bleak, help IS indeed available. Please, if things seem unbearable, reach out to a friend, loved one, doctor, etc … you don’t have to struggle through life’s rough spots alone.

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3 Responses to ““Things Fall Apart:” When a Tough Economy, Anxiety, & Medical Stressors Collide”

  1. rossj2 November 7, 2011 at 7:48 pm #

    Another great blog offering specifics about how any individual can take control of their own health from services and help readily available! Nice article and very helpful.

    John Ross

    • Angela November 7, 2011 at 8:20 pm #

      Thank you so much for taking the time to stop by and read (: ]). As you so rightly stated, I am a firm believer that the power of ones health and coping should indeed lie in the hands of the patient (or family for young children). With the propper information presented in an easy to understand way, anyone is capable of making choices that best fit their lives and beliefs.

      • rossj2 November 7, 2011 at 8:29 pm #

        Angela, if you have the time I would love your critique of my blogs at http://www.healthcaremadesimple.org. I am trying to educate Americans on how to think about health care and what they can do to help by managing their own health better to the extent that they can.

        John Ross

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